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Navy News Service for Wednesday, October 06, 2010
U.S. Navy sent this bulletin on October 06, 2010 03:46 PM

Navy News Service for Wednesday, October 06, 2010

NNS101006-20. CNO Visits Sailors In Europe, Speaks at NAVEUR Change of Command
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56426

NNS101006-23. ADM Fitzgerald Retires Following Distinguished Naval Career
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56428

NNS101006-24. NAVEUR-NAVAF, JFC Naples, Welcome New Commander
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56427

NNS101006-14. Submariner Receives Bronze Star for Service in Afghanistan
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56412

DNU -- October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month; the Afghan National Army officially takes over responsibility for training Afghan combat medics from U.S. service members; USS Makin Island (LHD 8) is scheduled to participate in San Francisco Fleet Week October 7 through 12.
-- http://www.navy.mil/swf/mmu/mmplyr.asp?id=15067

NNS101006-11. Navy Appoints an Additional Ombudsman-at-Large
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56410

NNS101006-12. Enterprise CSG Completes Synthetic Exercise, Departs for COMPTUEX
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56424

NNS101006-03. USS Essex, 31st MEU Conduct NEO Exercise
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56361

NNS101006-01. U.S. 7th Fleet Units to Participate in Eastern Endeavor 2010
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56419

NNS101005-20. ONR Simulator Prepares Warfighters Heading to Afghanistan
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56413

NNS101005-21. Continuing Promise 2010 Seabee Team Builds Success in Panama
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56401

NNS101006-08. Commanding Officers Lead SWOS Indoc at ATG San Diego
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56351

NNS101006-19. Information Dominance Warfare Officer 'Grandfather' Qualification Available on Navy eLearning
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56425

NNS101006-17. USS Constitution Honors Fallen Service Members
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56422

NNS101006-16. Naval Base Kitsap Community Kicks Off Domestic Violence Awareness Month
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56418

DNU -- Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., opens its gates to the San Diego Community for its annual air show.
-- http://www.navy.mil/swf/mmu/mmplyr.asp?id=15068

NNS101006-05. Military Performance Teams Thrill Audience at Miramar Air Show
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56365

NNS101006-09. Deputy Personnel Chief Observes Total Force Vision at Recruit Training Command
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56354

NNS101006-04. Essex Amphibious Ready Group Supports 31st MEU CERTEX
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56394

DNU -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) oral surgeons maintain the crew's dental readiness.
-- http://www.navy.mil/swf/mmu/mmplyr.asp?id=15069

DNU -- Sailors raise money for the Navy Ball at Naval Support Activity Rota, Spain.
-- http://www.navy.mil/swf/mmu/mmplyr.asp?id=15070

NNS101006-22. Current Daily News Update
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56430

NNS020723-21. This Day in Naval History - Oct. 06
-- http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=2743

All Hands Radio News - 7 October 2010
October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The Afghan National Army officially takes over responsibility for training Afghan combat medics from U.S. service members. USS Makin Island (LHD 8) is scheduled to participate in San Francisco Fleet Week Oct. 7-12.
  -- http://www.navy.mil/navydata/radioPlay.asp?id=4142


Eye on the Fleet - U.S. Navy Photo of The Day
-- http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=92441



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NNS101006-20. CNO Visits Sailors In Europe, Speaks at NAVEUR Change of Command

By Chief Mass Communication Specialist (SW/AW) Tiffini Jones Vanderwyst, Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs

NAPLES, Italy (NNS) -- Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary Roughead visited Sailors in Sigonella and Naples, Italy, October 4-6.

Roughead began his trip with a reenlistment ceremony for 11 Sailors during an all-hands call that included Airmen from Naval Air Station (NAS) Signella.

CNO thanked the reenlisting Sailors for their extraordinary service and dedication to our Navy and all the daily sacrifices they make to do their job.

"I would like to thank not only you for what you do, but your families for the support they give... for you to put this uniform on everyday and go off and do something that you love to do," said CNO.

While at the all-hands call, CNO presented three Bronze Stars and a Purple Heart to Sailors of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 8. CNO presented the Purple Heart medal and Bronze Star to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician 1st Class Harry Basnight for wounds received in action during a mission in Afghanistan. He awarded the other two Bronze Stars to Lt. Anthony Innamorato and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician 2nd Class Erich Villwock for their meritorious service during Operation Enduring Freedom.

In Naples, CNO met with Sailors and senior leadership at Naval Support Activity (NSA) Naples where he took the time to express his gratitude for their continual efforts in building strong maritime partnerships between the US, Europe and Africa.

"I thank you for what you are doing. The relationships that we have in Europe and Africa, the operations that we conduct are really making a difference." said Roughead.

Roughead wrapped up his visit to Italy with the Naval Forces Europe/Commander, Naval Forces Africa Change of Command ceremony where Adm. Samuel J. Locklear relieved Adm. Mark P. Fitzgerald as Commander, NAVEUR/NAVAF.


For more news from Chief of Naval Operations, visit www.navy.mil/local/cno/.

 
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NNS101006-23. ADM Fitzgerald Retires Following Distinguished Naval Career

By Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Africa/ Commander, U.S. 6th Fleet Public Affairs

NAPLES, Italy (NNS) -- Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa (NAVEUR-NAVAF), Commander, Allied Joint Forces Command (JFC) Naples, retired concluding a 37-year Naval career, here, Oct. 6.

Adm. Mark P. Fitzgerald, a native of Winchester, Mass., retired following a change of command ceremony at JFC Naples attended by senior military and civilian guests.

"Today, we honor [Fitzgerald] for what he has done to build relationships and partnerships, and we honor him for his 37 years of loyal service to our nation and Navy," said Adm. Gary Roughead, chief of naval operations. "[Fitzgerald's] record of service is one that is highlighted with leadership and command in peace and war. It's been his experience, his leadership, and that steady sense of purpose that has served our nation and the larger international community so well."

Roughead continued citing Fitzgerald's significant and lasting contributions to the security of our partners in Europe and Africa. He emphasized Fitzgerald's role in improving international maritime cooperation efforts combating piracy, illicit trafficking and improving energy security infrastructure within the vast area of responsibility.

As commander of NAVEUR-NAVAF, Fitzgerald's area of responsibility covered approximately half of the Atlantic Ocean, from the North Pole to Antarctica; as well as the Adriatic, Baltic, Barents, Black, Caspian, Mediterranean and North Seas; to include all of Russia, Europe and nearly the entire continent of Africa.

"After 37 years of wearing this uniform, it really seems like yesterday I just started," said Fitzgerald. "College, marriage, our honeymoon, which was driving for three days to Pensacola, and then I started flying off of our great aircraft carriers in the Pacific, Atlantic, Mediterranean and Indian oceans. Flying down south of the Equator, to the fjords of Norway, Caribbean, Red Sea, and Arabian Gulf...what an exciting life."

Also speaking at the ceremony were German Gen. Manfred Lange, chief of staff, Allied Command Operations, who complimented Fitzgerald for his significant achievements in bringing stability to the Balkans, Iraq and Mediterranean; and Gen. William "Kip" Ward, commander of U.S. Africa Command, who lauded Fitzgerald's numerous accomplishments in Africa.

"Success does not just happen," said Ward. "It takes leadership, vision, ingenuity, teamwork and a lot of hard work. Over the past three years, this command, under Fitzgerald's leadership, has been busy developing strategy, plans, and conducting sustained security engagement and operations to promote maritime safety and security, and helping to build partner security capacity in Africa."

Fitzgerald was commissioned in the Navy in 1973 and was designated a naval aviator in October 1975. He served at several carrier based attack squadrons, commanding a squadron during Desert Storm and leading the first Navy strike on Baghdad. He was selected for flag rank in September 1998, where his first flag assignment was as deputy commander of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command and he commanded Joint Task Force Determined Response in Aden, Yemen. He also served in several positions at the Pentagon, and commanded the U.S. 2nd Fleet. He turned over command of NAVEUR-NAVAF, JFC Naples to Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III.

His awards include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, three Navy Distinguished Service Medals, Defense Superior Service Medal, two Distinguished Flying Cross with Combat "V", the Bronze Star, Air Medals, and numerous other awards including NATO Meritorious Service Medal, Knight of the Maltese Cross (Grand Officer), German Cross of Honour in Gold, and Hungarian Alliance Service Medal. He has logged almost 5,000 flight hours and has completed over 1,100 carrier-arrested landings from 13 aircraft carriers.

Also recognized during the ceremony was Fitzgerald's wife, the former Barbara Newell, of Worcester, Mass., who was recently awarded the Distinguished Public Service Medal by Secretary of the Navy, Ray Mabus, for her significant contributions to Navy and Military families. Mrs. Fitzgerald worked diligently in support of three separate commands to develop an atmosphere of collaboration among political, civilian and military leaders, service members and their spouses as the Senior Lady for the Allied and Naples Overseas Spouses Club, honorary member of the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, and advisor to NAVEUR-NAVAF/JFC Naples Ombudsmen.

Fitzgerald and his wife, Barbara, plan to make Jacksonville, Fla. their new home.

For more news from Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/naveur/.

 
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NNS101006-24. NAVEUR-NAVAF, JFC Naples, Welcome New Commander

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William Pittman, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Africa/ Commander, U.S. 6th Fleet Public Affairs

NAPLES, Italy (NNS) -- Adm. Mark Fitzgerald turned over command to Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III, during a change of command ceremony at Allied Joint Force Command (JFC) Naples, Oct. 6.

The ceremony marked the completion of Fitzgerald's tour as commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa (NAVEUR-NAVAF), commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples.

Numerous dignitaries and visitors from civilian and military forces throughout the world attended the ceremony; dignitaries included Adm. Gary Roughead, chief of naval operations; Army Gen. William "Kip" Ward, commander, U.S. Africa Command; and German Air Force Gen. Manfred Lange, chief of staff, Allied Command Operations.

"Today, we honor [Fitzgerald] for what he has done to build relationships and partnerships [in Europe and Africa], and we honor him for his 37 years of loyal service to our nation and Navy," said Roughead. "As the U.S. Navy's only component commander that serves two combatant commands, he has displayed that rare mix of vision and leadership to outpace the most sustained operational burdens while fundamentally shaping the community of nations for decades to come. He has been the steady hand in our Navy; over the course of his many accomplishments, it has been his experience, his leadership, and that steady sense of purpose that has served our nation and the larger international community so well as the commander of NAVEUR-NAVAF since he arrived in Naples."

During his time in Naples, Fitzgerald successfully oversaw a large number of missions and programs, to include the multinational annual exercises of Noble Manta, Juniper Cobra, Phoenix Express, and the preconception and introduction of Africa Partnership Station (APS) East and West.

"[Fitzgerald] has personally broadened and deepened global maritime partnerships with our most capable allies and friends, and in key ways, he focused our collective action toward building partnership capacity by bringing APS to life," said Roughead. "In three short years, there has been more international support growing commitment in terms of time and resources, and since early 2009 he has been operating APS on both coasts of Africa. When he concluded APS' final planning conference here last month, there were 25 nations that participated. In three short years, that is a remarkable achievement."

Ward also spoke highly of Fitzgerald's accomplishments with APS and operations in Africa.

"With Fitzgerald's leadership, this command made great strides with the engagements that we had with our African partners, as well as helping promote maritime safety and security and full maritime domain awareness activities in Africa," said Ward. "[NAVEUR-NAVAF] is strengthening existing relationships and expanding our network of partners on the continent, and that is to the good of the global community. The remarkable success of APS is directly attributable to Fitzgerald's amazing leadership."

Roughead then presented Fitzgerald with the Distinguished Service Medal. Ward later presented Fitzgerald with the Defense Distinguished Service Medal for distinguished performance of duty contributing to the national security and defense of the United States of America. Lange also presented Fitzgerald with the NATO Meritorious Service Medal for his personal initiative and dedication to furthering peace and security for the NATO alliance, and a NATO Non-Article Five Medal for the Balkans, for his service in Kosovo.

Fitzgerald took the podium and took the time to thank the crew for their hard work.

"We have done world-changing events here at NAVEUR-NAVAF and JFC, and certainly the staff here, and the commanders in the field are the ones that made it happen," said Fitzgerald.

"They continue to keep the alliance safe and secure, protecting its citizens, and promoting democracy, freedom and prosperity. I am truly honored that I was able to work with a true team of professionals."

After he finished reading his orders, Fitzgerald walked to the center of the ceremony floor, where he was joined by Lange, Locklear, Roughead, Ward and Fleet Master Chief Brad LeVault, NAVEUR-NAVAF's fleet master chief, where they participated in the flag-passing part of the ceremony. LeVault gave two U.S. Navy flags to Fitzgerald to signify command of U.S. Naval Forces Europe and command of U.S. Naval Forces Africa. Fitzgerald then passed the flags from Lange, to Roughead, to Ward, then finally to Locklear, completing the symbolic transition of command.

"As we say farewell to one leader, we welcome another great one; [Locklear], who will take command of NAVEUR-NAVAF," said Roughead. "I know there is no one better suited than him to take up this important responsibility, this important command; at a time when global trends will only demand more of our maritime partnerships and in new ways. I know that he will continue to build upon the foundation that Fitzgerald has set, that he will nurture the relationships that Fitzgerald advanced, and he will maintain our Navy's focus in this crucial region. For these are the home waters of our longest and most enduring allies and friends, much of the undeniably global good ever delivered from the sea is generated from here."

Locklear then read his orders, officially taking over command of NAVEUR-NAVAF. Upon becoming commander, NAVEUR-NAVAF, Locklear greeted his new team with a happy welcome and expressed his enthusiasm of joining the team.

"I am deeply honored and proud to serve as the leader of the dedicated men and women of NAVEUR-NAVAF," said Locklear. "I am humbled by the sheer geographic size of this area of responsibility; area that stretches from both poles, touches three continents and is watched by the Arctic, Atlantic and Indian oceans. These are my new home waters, and I will rely on the men and women of NAVEUR-NAVAF to help me navigate them as we work together for a comprehensive approach to enhance security throughout Europe and Africa."

Locklear comes to Naples after serving as Director, Navy Staff. Locklear is a 1992 graduate of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, and holds a master's degree in Public Administration from George Washington University.

The NAVEUR-NAVAF area of responsibility covers approximately half of the Atlantic Ocean, from the North Pole to Antarctica; as well as the Adriatic, Baltic, Barents, Black, Caspian, Mediterranean and North Seas; to include all of Russia, Europe and nearly the entire continent of Africa.

For more news from Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/naveur/.

 
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NNS101006-14. Submariner Receives Bronze Star for Service in Afghanistan

By Lt. Patrick Evans, Submarine Group 2 Public Affairs

GROTON, Conn. (NNS) -- A Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) New London submariner, who recently returned from a year long deployment to Afghanistan, was awarded the Bronze Star Medal Oct. 3 for serving as a critical link with counter improvised explosive device (C-IED) operations.

Lt. Cmdr. Colin McGuire, USS Emory S. Land (AS-39) Detachment (Det) E, commanding officer, received the award for his Individual Augmentee (IA) assignment, working C-IED operations in Afghanistan from June 15, 2009 to May 18 this year.

McGuire was awarded the Bronze Star for exceptionally meritorious service while serving as the Combined Joint Task Force (CJTF) Paladin CJ3 Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan liaison officer (CSTC-A LNO). According to his award narrative, "McGuire's efforts saved countless United States and coalition forces lives."

In addition, "McGuire was the driving force in improving Afghan National Security Force counter IED capabilities. His actions directly contributed to wage increases that improved career opportunities for Afghan Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Technicians."

McGuire was also responsible for creating the first-ever Afghan Regional Forensic Laboratory in Kandahar. He led the effort to develop Afghan National Police EOD and Quick Reaction Force capabilities in Kandahar City during a time of increased attacks. These agencies were a valuable asset to Kandahar City, providing an additional force to engage an increasing threat, according to the award narrative.

Rear Adm. Michael McLaughlin, commander, Submarine Group 2, presented McGuire the Bronze Star on behalf of Maj. Gen. Timothy P. McHale, Support, United States Forces-Afghanistan deputy commander.

Cmdr. Matt Olson, NOSC New London commanding officer, praised McGuire and Navy Reservists for exceptional service.

"This is one more example of the tremendous work Navy Reservists are performing as they are forward deployed," said Olson. "They are providing expertise and knowledge, and are doing great things in Iraq, Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa or wherever their nation calls."

McGuire, who grew up in Wichita, Kan., is a 1997 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. He served aboard Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Springfield (SSN 761), before transitioning into the Reserves. McGuire has led AS-39 Det E since December 2008. In his civilian career, McGuire serves as a Special Agent in the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

The Bronze Star was authorized by Executive Order 9419 in February 1944. To be eligible for the Bronze Star, a person must distinguish themselves by heroic or meritorious achievement or service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy.

For more news from Commander Submarine Group 2, visit www.navy.mil/local/Subgru2/.

 
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NNS101006-11. Navy Appoints an Additional Ombudsman-at-Large

By Bruce Moody, Commander, Navy Installations Command Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- Chief of naval operations (CNO) appointed an additional Ombudsman-at-Large Sept. 13.

Brandy Clingan accepted the appointment by Adm. Gary Roughead, as Debby Greene stepped down from the position after 15 months of service.

Clingan, along with Bobbi West, spouse of Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) (SS/SW) Rick D. West, are now the Navy's two Ombudsmen-at-Large.

Clingan and West are responsible for advising CNO and MCPON on matters affecting Sailors and their families. They report directly to CNO.

As Ombudsmen-at-Large, they act as a focal point for the important flow of information from Navy Ombudsmen, Sailors, and their families to the CNO. They serve as an advocate for the Navy Family Ombudsman Program.

Ombudsmen-at-Large travel to Navy sites with the Navy Inspector General and MCPON. They may also visit commands, meet with command ombudsmen and family members, and attend meetings and conferences. From these visits, information important to the successful operation and improvement of the Ombudsman program may be shared with the Commander, Navy Installations Command's Ombudsman Program Manager.

Clingan is also chairman of Naval Services FamilyLine, an organization of Navy Family volunteers which equips sea service family members to succeed through various educational platforms.

"I am deeply honored and humbled by this appointment," Clingan said. "Ombudsmen play an important role in the success of a command's mission, because family readiness is key to mission readiness."

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Navy Family Ombudsman program.

"As a Navy spouse, I have watched the Navy's Ombudsman program grow," Clingan said. "The program is stronger than ever, thanks to the program managers and an amazing global network of volunteers. They are doing extraordinary work in extraordinary times."

Clingan said she is impressed with the support ombudsmen provide family members of active duty, Reserve and individual augmentee Sailors. They provide support to families serving in locations which are remote, isolated or outside the close proximity of a Navy installation.

For more news from Commander, Navy Installations Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/cni/.

 
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NNS101006-12. Enterprise CSG Completes Synthetic Exercise, Departs for COMPTUEX

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael Croft, USS Enterprise Public Affairs

USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Carrier Strike Group (CSG) departed for its Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) Oct. 5, after successfully completing an in-depth synthetic training scenario.

The Fleet Synthetic Training (FST), which took place while the strike group was in port, was designed to prepare the strike group for the three-week COMPTUEX period at sea.

Tactical Training Group, Atlantic, an arm of Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet, administered the FST to test intelligence, air defense, surface defense, mine warfare and other warfare areas that a carrier strike group must be proficient in prior to deploying. The intent of the synthetic training is to ensure that carrier strike groups will be ready to fight the scenario-driven events encountered during COMPTUEX.

"FST events are an important part of the fleet response program, which is designed to provide a naval force that can maintain a meaningful forward presence while generating the ability to surge additional combat power as needed to meet regional combatant commander requirements," said Rear Adm. Terry Kraft, commander, Carrier Strike Group 12/Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. "Along with testing our overall readiness, FST events also provide some excellent training opportunities that will help build the strike group team."

The training focuses on interaction between the ships of Enterprise CSG and attempts to work out any issues in communication or integration prior to performing combat-based scenarios underway.

"FST provides an opportunity to rehearse strike group tactics, techniques, procedures and pre-planned responses before performing them at sea," said Capt. George Lang, Enterprise CSG operations officer. "Short of getting underway, FST provides a realistic scenario for staff planning for shipboard and air wing execution."

Now that the carrier strike group has departed for COMPTUEX, the training, techniques and execution will be tested in a practical environment.

COMPTUEX will incorporate ships from Norway and the United Kingdom, adding multinational training to the underway environment.

Upon completing COMPTUEX, the strike group is scheduled to return to port for a short period before participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise scheduled for later this year.

Enterprise Carrier Strike Group consists of USS Enterprise, the guided-missile destroyers USS Bulkeley (DDG 84), USS Barry (DDG 52) and USS Mason (DDG 87), the guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG 56), USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8), Carrier Air Wing 1 and Destroyer Squadron 2.

Enterprise Strike Group is conducting COMPTUEX as part of its work-ups in preparation for an upcoming deployment.

For more information about Enterprise, Carrier Strike Group 12 or Carrier Air Wing 1 visit www.Enterprise.navy.mil, www.ccsg12.surfor.navy.mil, and www.cvw1.navy.mil.

For more news from USS Enterprise, visit www.navy.mil/local/cvn65/.

 
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NNS101006-03. USS Essex, 31st MEU Conduct NEO Exercise

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Casey H. Kyhl, USS Essex Public Affairs

USS Essex, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Essex (LHD 2) and the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) worked in conjunction to conduct a non-combatant evacuation operation (NEO) exercise Oct. 1 off the coast of Okinawa, Japan.

The exercise was designed to demonstrate the Essex Amphibious Ready Group's (ARG) ability to quickly evacuate civilians during a time of crisis.

"Today's exercise was a superb effort by the Essex Amphibious Ready Group team," said Capt. Dave Fluker, USS Essex, executive officer. "The Amphibious Squadron 11 planners and ultimately 31st MEU Marines and Essex Sailors executed a robust scheme to move scores of evacuees via aircraft and landing craft to a safe haven on board USS Essex."

The NEO process began on shore, where nearly 100 Marines played the role of civilian evacuees. Other Marines processed evacuees and transported them to either a designated beach or airstrip. After being checked for weapons and contraband, evacuees boarded landing craft utilities, landing craft, air cushions and aircraft, which transported them to the ship. Once aboard, Essex Sailors took over.

"Essex's Sailors really had to work hand-in-hand for an evolution like this to go well, and I think we did that very well," said Chief Master-at-Arms Stacy L. Holmes, USS Essex Security Department. "They conducted thorough searches, processed the evacuees quickly and got the injured exactly where they needed to be."

Security personnel searched the evacuees and guided them to the hangar bay, where they were entered into a tracking program. Those requiring medical attention were taken to Essex's medical ward.

"Essex Medical department is designed and staffed for the purpose of receiving casualties," said Lt. Cmdr. Mohammad Kohistany, USS Essex medical administration officer. "Medical elevators rapidly transfer casualties from the flight deck and hangar bay to medical facilities capable of providing intensive medical assistance to as many as 600 casualties. We perform a medical screening, assess all their medical problems and give the necessary care and treatment."

Throughout the exercise, Sailors from USS Essex Operations department stood by to identify the evacuees and assist the U.S. embassy in tracking the progress of the operation. These Sailors also monitored the situation ashore to assist in locating missing Americans or update security information for ground forces.

In addition to the Security Department, Essex used its ship's self-defense force (SSDF) of more than 200 Sailors to assist in the exercise. Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Michael A. Adams was one of the SSDF Sailors activated for the drill.

"Its great to know that we can help out at a moment's notice like this," said Adams. "Essex is usually right there when something is happening in this region, and I would be glad to be a part of something that could help so many people. After watching the drill today, I know we are ready."

After the evacuees were processed, they were assigned to one of the ship's berthing areas to relax and refresh while awaiting repatriation.

Essex can sustain operations as an afloat staging base for NEO operations for weeks with minimal external support.

"It was great to see the exercise come to fruition, especially given its complexity," said Fluker. "It was achieved through the hard work of the Essex ARG Sailors and Marines. "No matter how hard the challenge, or how obscure the tasking, the Essex ARG professionals are always ready to answer the call."

NEO exercises are held to practice the ability of the U.S. military to assist the Department of State in evacuating noncombatants, nonessential military personnel, selected host-nation citizens, and third country nationals from a foreign nation to an appropriate refuge in time of emergency.

Previous real-world NEOs in which the U.S. Navy assisted include the evacuation of American citizens from Lebanon due to political unrest in 2006 and evacuation of the Philippines in 1991 after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo.

Essex, commanded by Capt. Troy Hart, is part of the forward-deployed Essex Amphibious Ready Group, and is on patrol in the Western Pacific.

For more news from USS Essex (LHD 2), visit www.navy.mil/local/lhd2/.

 
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NNS101006-01. U.S. 7th Fleet Units to Participate in Eastern Endeavor 2010

From U.S. 7th Fleet Public Affairs

YOKOSUKA, Japan (NNS) -- A guided-missile destroyer and maritime patrol aircraft assigned to Commander U.S. 7th Fleet, will participate in the Republic of Korea-hosted Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) exercise Eastern Endeavor 2010, Oct. 13-14.

USS Lassen (DDG 82) and a P3-C Orion from Commander Patrol & Reconnaissance Force, 7th Fleet, will take part in the exercise.

Eastern Endeavor, hosted by the Republic of Korea, aims to halt illicit weapons of mass destruction (WMD) proliferation by promoting proactive information sharing and enabling the development of capabilities and nations.

The exercise helps advance international efforts to deter proliferation of WMD. All PSI supporters have agreed to prevent the trafficking of such weapons, their delivery systems and related materials to and from states and non-states actors of proliferation concern. PSI participants address the proliferation challenge on all fronts, including air, sea and land.

Lassen is forward-deployed to Yokosuka, Japan, and is a member of Commander Battle Force, 7th Fleet. Commander Patrol & Reconnaissance Force, 7th Fleet is headquartered at Misawa Air Base in Misawa, Japan.

For more news from Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/c7f/.

 
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NNS101005-20. ONR Simulator Prepares Warfighters Heading to Afghanistan

By Geoff Fein, Office of Naval Research Public Affairs

ARLINGTON, Va. (NNS) -- The latest upgrades to the Infantry Immersion Trainer (IIT), a simulator used to fully inundate Marines with the sights, sounds and smells of Afghanistan before ever setting foot in theater, will be demonstrated to Department of Defense officials aboard Camp Pendleton Oct. 7.

"The trainer equips infantry with simulation tools similar to what is provided to aviators, ship captains and tank commanders," said Clarke Lethin, Future Immersive Training Environment (FITE) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Office of Naval Research (ONR) technical manager.

The FITE JCTD demonstration marks the culmination of a multimillion dollar investment and a two-year intensive collaborative effort to integrate technologies that support mixed and augmented reality for training.

"The virtual characters we have now look more realistic; they react more," Lethin said. "We know the position of all the trainees within the facility. We've added animatronics straight from theme parks for background role players and market vendors to make the atmosphere [real]."

Advanced sound effects have also improved the immersive conditions of the immersive trainer.

Originally developed to provide training against a realistic Iraqi backdrop, the virtual trainer at I Marine Expeditionary Force has undergone revisions to focus on the Afghan environment, adding enhanced tracking technologies and communications for a more authentic user experience.

In its early phases, the IIT focused on kinetics and movement, but for a more immersive scenario, Marines now engage virtual Afghans, or avatars, in conversation to emphasize local languages, such as Pashto.

"Our focus is on demonstrating a relevant and realistic audio experience to go with the visual and physical training experience," Lethin said. "Battlefield sounds logically linked to scenario-based training conditions and cues add to the trainees' perception of reality."

The Office of Naval Research provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps' technological advantage.

Through its affiliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 industry partners.

ONR employs approximately 1,400 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel with additional employees at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.

For more news from Office of Naval Research, visit www.navy.mil/local/onr/.

 
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NNS101005-21. Continuing Promise 2010 Seabee Team Builds Success in Panama

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Zane Ecklund, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet Public Affairs

CHIRIQUI GRAND, Panama (NNS) -- Seabees embarked aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) improved the quality of life for Panamanian citizens by adding upgrades to a school and medical clinic in Chiriqui Grand, Panama, Oct. 3, as part of Continuing Promise 2010.

Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 7 (NMCB 7) and Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 (CBMU 202) Seabees added window screens, 290 feet of fencing, 70 feet of sidewalk, and playground equipment to the Silico Creek School.

Seabees also added an ambulance carport, medical storage space, and a septic system to the Silico Creek Clinic.

Lt. j.g. Kelly Stevens, officer in charge of the Seabees participating in Continuing Promise, emphasized the importance of construction projects in regards to the success of the mission.

"Seabees hope to build a strong relationship with Panama by constructing quality products to improve the daily lives of those who are less fortunate, and we judge mission success by the lives we impact long after we depart," said Kelly. "Through our 'Can Do' spirit we will undoubtedly win the hearts and minds of the lives we touch here in Panama."

Chief Steelworker (SWC) Leslie Morgan, NMCB 7, enjoyed the opportunity to help people, even if it only meant giving them basic amenities such as plumbing.

"Most of the deployments I've been on have been on a base, but this mission I've been able to get out and meet people, and you find how nice people are," said Morgan. "It's a good experience for the Seabees."

The improvements made by Seabees at the Silico Creek Clinic greatly increased the capability of the facility which provides care to 3,000 individuals. The construction at Silico Creek School increased the safety and sanitation of the facility for the children attending the school.

Equipment Operator Constructionman John Hinds, NMCB 7, said he appreciated the opportunity to help the Panamanian people.

"Being able to provide people with things like this makes me feel like we're helping these people progress their education, and I like knowing I was part of that," said Hinds. "When people think of the military, they think of big guns and trucks, but we're here building stuff like schools."

Continuing Promise 2010 is a humanitarian civic assistance (HCA) mission. The assigned medical and engineering staff embarked aboard Iwo Jima work with partner nation teams to provide medical, dental, veterinary, and engineering assistance to eight different nations to improve mutual understanding of current medical issues.

For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/cusns/


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NNS101006-08. Commanding Officers Lead SWOS Indoc at ATG San Diego

By David Hostetler, Naval Surface Forces Public Affairs

SAN DIEGO (NNS) -- Four commanding officers from San Diego-based ships shared their guidance and expectations with 35 junior officers in the latest Surface Warfare Officer School Indoctrination (SWOS Intro) class held at Afloat Training Group (ATG), San Diego Sept. 27.

Cmdr. Jeff Oakey, USS New Orleans (LPD 18); Cmdr. Jeff Miller, USS Rentz (FFG 46); Lt. Cmdr. Elaine Brunelle, MCM Crew Leader/USS Warrior (MCM 10); and Lt. Cmdr. Jim Rushton, MCM Crew Constant/USS Chief (MCM 14); took part in the seminar which has been an on-going part of the five-week curriculum since the courses' inception.

In addition to answering questions from junior officers, commanding officers were also able to impart their leadership philosophy.

"Ask a lot of three-letter words - 'how?'... 'why?' You should be curious enough and persistent enough to understand how these different systems come together to make a warship go," said Cmdr. Oakey.

"Do the right thing even when no one is looking," said Lt. Cmdr. Brunelle.

Capt. Mike Taylor, ATG San Diego commanding officer, said open and candid discussions with commanding officers, department heads, command master chiefs and fellow division officers contribute to SWOS Intro.

"It has proven to be a valuable method to have students interact with and learn their expectations as a division officer directly from the waterfront commanding officers, as well as critical others in their chain of command," said Taylor.

Students are afforded the opportunity to visit ships to observe maintenance and conduct space inspections, as well as earn their weapons qualifications at the gun range in preparation for their duties as shipboard division officers and watchstanders.

Coupling the hands-on training with classroom and simulator training in damage control, engineering, navigation, seamanship, shiphandling, and maritime warfare, the course receives positive feedback from students and waterfront leadership. With 52 ships in San Diego, access to leadership and actual shipboard equipment is only a short walk away.

"The level of cooperation we get (from the ships) is tremendous," said Taylor. "This is not a static course. This is extremely dynamic in content, presentation and location."

The SWOS Intro Class, offered in fleet concentrations areas, has been conducted on the waterfront at ATG San Diego since early 2009. Two hundred ten officers have graduated from the San Diego course, with more than 800 graduates fleet-wide.

For more information about the Naval Surface Force, US Pacific Fleet, visit
http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor.  

For information on Afloat Training Group, Pacific visit http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/atgpac.  

For more news from Naval Surface Forces, visit www.navy.mil/local/cnsp/.  


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NNS101006-19. Information Dominance Warfare Officer 'Grandfather' Qualification Available on Navy eLearning

By Ed Barker, Naval Education and Training Command Public Affairs

PENSACOLA, Fla. (NNS) -- Veteran Information Dominance Corps (IDC) officers with significant experience and service were authorized accelerated qualification as Information Dominance Warfare Officers (IDWOs) Sept. 28 through completion of the IDWO training module and test available on Navy eLearning.

OPNAV Instruction 1412.13 includes an accelerated qualification provision, allowing IDC officers with service prior to the inception of the IDWO qualification program, a waiver from the formal qualification process. Details and specific time requirements to qualify for accelerated qualification vary by community.

"During the process of establishing the program, we recognized that many IDC officers already had significant experience and demonstrated service in their individual communities," said Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance, Vice Adm. Jack Dorsett. "In fact, most O-3s and above had already completed extensive community-specific Professional Qualification Program and Personnel Qualification Standard programs and boards that equated to the new IDC-wide qualification process.

"Officers that met select career experience criteria can log on to Navy eLearning and demonstrate their knowledge of the other communities in the IDC, earning them the qualification and pin. This approach is consistent with those used for the introduction of warfare qualification insignias in the past," said Dorsett.

Specific guidelines and eligibility for the qualification waiver can be found in enclosure one of the IDWO qualification instruction, and additional details on the program can be found in Naval Administrative Message (NAVADMIN) 328/10.

Details on the standard (non-accelerated) process for qualification can also be found in the OPNAV instruction. Officers must pass the accelerated qualification test no later than Jan. 31, 2012 to qualify as IDWO via the accelerated method.

"We've seen significant interest in the IDWO module since the launch on Navy eLearning," said Capt. Hank Reeves, NeL project director, assigned to the Navy's Sea Warrior program. "Within the first week of it being available on NeL, there were over 2,000 completions, and they are still going strong."

The IDWO qualification program and breast insignia were announced in NAVADMIN 058-10 in February, and work on the qualification program, including the training module and test for accelerated qualification, immediately followed.

"We were challenged to go from the concept of accelerated qualifications to online completions in a very short time," said Sam Kelley, Center for Information Dominance Model Management Program director of operations. "Fortunately, the players from OPNAV, Cyber Forces Command, Navy eLearning and the development working group all came together to make this happen. Looking at the rate of hits to the course and test, I think we can say it's been well-received."

The IDWO accelerated qualification module and test can be located through the Learning tab on NKO: https://www.nko.navy.mil.  

For more information on the IDWO program, refer to NAVADMIN 328/10 and OPNAV Instruction 1412.13.

For more information on the Naval Education and Training Command, visit: https://www.netc.navy.mil/.  

For more news from Naval Education and Training Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/cnet/.

 
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NNS101006-17. USS Constitution Honors Fallen Service Members

By Seaman Shannon S. Heavin, USS Constitution Public Affairs

LEXINGTON, Mass. (NNS) -- Sailors assigned to USS Constitution honored fallen Massachusetts service members of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom during the first Battle Road Memorial March in Lexington, Mass. Oct. 2.

Sailors performed a color guard during the opening ceremony, and four others participated in the march.

The Battle Road Memorial March correlates the historic beginning of the American Revolution to modern-day military operations.

"This was a unique experience as service members to honor patriots who sacrificed their lives for our freedom," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) Airman Mark Alexander. "It's an honor to take part in this first battle road march; I hope it becomes tradition."

Constitution Executive Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Anthony Savage, Master-at-Arms Seaman Gary Matthias and Airman John Fisher also participated in the march sponsored by the Third Legal Support Organization, a group comprised of Massachusetts Army Reservists.

The opening ceremony of the march began at 9 a.m. with more than 100 Army Reservists in attendance. The names of the 125 Massachusetts service members who died were read, following brief speeches, including one by Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown.

"As an officer of 40 years, I believe we don't do a good enough job of honoring those fallen Soldiers, and these bricks represent the great honor of our brothers and sisters," said Col. Patrick Cummings, Third Legal Support Organization. "It was a tremendous honor as well to have the USS Constitution here to represent the blue."

The march followed with each participant carrying in their rucksack or seabag a brick with a fallen service member's name painted on it.

The march lasted about five hours, ending at the Old North Bridge in Concord, Mass., the site of the first American victory in the Revolutionary War. The participants returned to Lexington by bus, and thereafter, a celebration ensued at St. Nicholas Church.

"As the group of Sailors and Soldiers marched that same path taken by the British Soldiers in 1775, I was able to empathize and better understand the significance of the events of April 19th and 20th of 1775," said Savage. "For the duration of the march, we united the armed forces and reflected the past and fight for freedom to come. Today was a day to remember."

Constitution is located in the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston. She is the world's oldest commissioned warship afloat and welcomes more than 500,000 visitors a year.

For more information on Constitution, visit www.history.navy.mil/ussconstitution  or http://www.facebook.com/ussconstitutionofficial.  

For more news from USS Constitution, visit www.navy.mil/local/constitution/


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NNS101006-16. Naval Base Kitsap Community Kicks Off Domestic Violence Awareness Month

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Maebel Tinoko, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Northwest

BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS) -- Sailors and members of the Naval Base Kitsap (NBK) community kicked off Domestic Violence Awareness Month during a walk and candlelight vigil at the Jackson Park Community Center in Bremerton, Wash., Oct. 5.

Holding signs and banners, Sailors and members of the community participated in the one-mile Silent Witness Walk through Jackson Park military housing, promoting domestic violence awareness.

"This is our third annual Silent Witness Walk and candlelight vigil," said Britt Feldman, program manager for Fleet and Family Service Center (FFSC), NBK. "We hold this every October as a way to show awareness to the community and educate the public about domestic violence. Domestic violence is not a topic people want to talk about, and it affects people in our community in so many ways. We want to make sure they know where to get help and where to find resources."

The candlelight vigil was held after the walk to help further the community's awareness of domestic violence.

Wooden silhouettes of women were displayed, each representing a victim of domestic violence that lived within the community and their stories were affixed to each silhouette. Susan Vitale-Olson and Pam O'Neil-Allen were part of this presentation.

"This is to honor those who have lost their lives to domestic violence, and it really reaches home in our community," said Feldman. "I encourage people to get involved in anyway they can and help put an end to domestic violence because it is a community problem. If anyone needs help the Fleet and Family Support Center is open to them."

The FFSC offers counseling and educational programs including marital issues, anger management, stress management, parenting, mental health and substance abuse.

"It's important to get the message out to the community and educate people about this issue," said Sonar Technician (Submarine) 3rd Class Robert Goddard, Submarine Development Squadron (DEVRON) 5. "Domestic violence needs to be stopped, and hopefully this reaches out to people who need resources and help."

For military families identified as being in an abusive situation, the Family Advocacy Program (FAP) provides intervention, support services and treatment. The FAP works with FFSC and other organizations to provide safety planning, counseling, educational programs and other services.

In addition to FFSC or FAP, victims of domestic violence can contact their chain of command, security, local law enforcement or medical personnel.

There are two types of reporting options, restricted and unrestricted. Restricted reports do not involve military chain of command or law enforcement.

Unrestricted reports will include some type of investigation by command and/or law enforcement. Both options make available to victims the full range of advocacy, medical and counseling services.

Victims can also call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or visit their website at www.ndvh.org.  


For more news from Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Northwest, visit www.navy.mil/local/nwpacen/.


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NNS101006-05. Military Performance Teams Thrill Audience at Miramar Air Show

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jose Lopez, Jr., Navy Public Affairs Support Element West

MCAS MIRAMAR, Calif. (NNS) -- The U.S. Marines, along with the other military services, opened their doors to the San Diego area and hosted the annual air show Oct. 1-3, 2010 at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar.

The Navy Blue Angels, Canadian Snow Birds, Army Golden Knights and Navy Leap Frogs were among the performers at this year's event.

The crowd received a special treat as both the Golden Knights and Leap Frogs jumped together, a feature that does not happen often.

"It's great when you get to work with the Golden Knights," said Special Warfare Operator 1st Class Aaron Darakjy, a member of the Navy Leap Frogs. "We found out they were here, we were in the area and had no show, so we decided to jump together."

Soldiers from the Gold Demo Team performed the aerial acrobatics the team is known for, along with their Navy counterparts, at the air show to the delight of the crowd.

"We get to travel down the country doing sports events and landing at high schools to support the Army's mission," said Army Staff Sgt. Steven Robertson, member of the Golden Knights. "A few times a year we get to jump with our buddies the Navy Leap Frogs. This jump is memorable because we got to do it in their backyard."

Both jumpers enjoy the work they've been assigned to perform with their teams, bringing their service to the local communities they visit.

"I've got the best job in the world," said Robertson, as he re-packed his parachute for the afternoon performance. "My office is in an airplane. I get to jump out of it every day and meet new people. I can't ask for anything better."

"See that 8-year-old boy?" said Darakjy, as he re-packed his parachute with the assistance of spectators. "I was him thirty years ago. I was at an air show and said, 'I will do that one day.'"

For more news from Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, visit www.navy.mil/local/nrnpasew/.

 
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NNS101006-09. Deputy Personnel Chief Observes Total Force Vision at Recruit Training Command

By Sarah King, Naval Service Training Command Public Affairs

NAVAL STATION GREAT LAKES, Ill. (NNS) -- Assistant Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education, served as the Reviewing Officer for a Pass-in-Review ceremony aboard Recruit Training Command (RTC), Great Lakes, Ill., Sept. 24, where 582 recruits officially became Sailors.

Ms. Steffanie Easter also visited several training facilities and met with the men and women responsible for transforming civilians into Sailors.

When asked what she thought was the most effective tool Recruit Division Commanders (RDC) possess to help them transform civilians to Sailors in just eight weeks, Easter responded, "Although RDCs have a variety of training tools at their disposal, based on what I have observed over the last day, the experience an RDC has gained over their career is probably the very best tool they have to train recruits.

"Even though all RDCs completed C-school, which is designed to prepare them to train recruits, I think their personal experience, their ability to relate to recruits, takes their impact to another level. You can't teach that in the classroom...you can't develop a curriculum around that."

Easter is the civilian executive advisor for the planning and programming of all manpower, personnel, training and education resources, and budgeting for the Navy, as well as ensuring the development of the information systems and tools used to effectively manage the Navy Total Force.

Navy Total Force involves attracting, recruiting, developing, assigning, and retaining a highly-skilled workforce for the Navy, an essential element when attracting future Sailors.

"With the economy being the way it is, we are finding a lot of people with various skills, at various levels that want to join the Navy," Easter said. "Over the last day I have met people with college degrees who have entered the workplace and decided to leave. I met others whose jobs' went away and decided to join the Navy. The Navy is a great place to work, and that in itself helps attract the best talent."

While visiting RTC, Easter toured USS Marvin Shields, a recruit barracks; USS Indianapolis, a basic water survival skills trainer; and Freedom Hall, RTC's physical training facility - all sites where civilians and uniformed members work side by side.

Easter said she believes RTC is leading the way toward the Navy Total Force vision.

"What I saw here the last couple of days epitomizes what we are trying to accomplish," she said. "Sitting in the galleys and seeing the civilian workforce support those Sailors; there was no distinction. There was one team, one goal, and one objective. That is what we are trying to create, and RTC epitomizes this vision."

Easter also noted the efforts RTC has made in regard to workplace flexibility initiatives that have been put in place. She commended the command for earning an Honorable Mention 2010 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Business Excellence in Workplace Flexibility.

"Those efforts go across the board," Easter said. "It touches every part of Total Force, the civilians, as well as the uniformed members."

The Alfred P. Sloan foundation has recognized 200 civilian business organizations across the United States, and RTC's honorable mention award is the first time a military command has been recognized in the award's six-year history.

"I was able to see your accomplishments firsthand," she said. "To read the award is one thing, but to be here and see it in action is another. RTC is definitely leading the way. I commend you on forging that path."

Easter has served for more than 24 years in federal service. After graduating from North Carolina State University, she began her career with Naval Air Systems Command and progressed through the ranks. Throughout her career, Easter has worked alongside military personnel and encourages civilians to learn as much as they can from their uniformed counterparts by asking questions and listening to what they have to say.

"Just because you don't wear the uniform doesn't mean you don't have the same passion," she said. "You're impacting the people that wear the uniform, and people that are defending our freedom. The more you understand Navy culture, the more effective you will be."

Although training at RTC lasts only eight weeks, Easter says Sailors leaving RTC will depart with the knowledge of how to work with one another to accomplish a task.

"I think when recruits leave here, they will never forget that sense of teamwork and camaraderie, and know they are totally dependent upon their shipmate and their shipmate is totally dependent upon them," she said.

Easter also visited USS Trayer (BST-21), a 210-foot-long Arleigh Burke-class destroyer simulator that uses Hollywood-style special effects to create challenging and realistic training scenarios based on actual events, including the terrorist attack on USS Cole (DDG-67).

Easter observed a BST-21 Completion Ceremony, where recruits exchange their recruit ball caps for Navy ball caps. She described the ceremony as not only "awesome," but an experience Sailors will carry with them the rest of their lives.

"(After the tour) I had a sense of what they went through," she said. "You may have to refresh them on techniques such as firefighting and damage control that are more tactical, but the feeling of earning a ball cap and becoming a Sailor is something they will never forget."

For more news from Naval Service Training Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/greatlakes/.

 
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NNS101006-04. Essex Amphibious Ready Group Supports 31st MEU CERTEX

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Casey H. Kyhl, USS Essex Public Affairs

USS ESSEX, At Sea (NNS) -- The 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), with support from the ships of the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), completed a MEU certification exercise (CERTEX) Oct. 4 and is now certified for deployment.

The CERTEX was conducted to validate the MEU's ability to effectively respond to unforeseen events and to keep the skills of individual Marines and elements sharp and ready for use in real-world events.

"Every time we embark an ARG ship for a deployment, we need to be certified as a MEU," said Lt. Col. Michael Monti, 31st MEU operations officer. "That certification proves that we are ready to be deployed anywhere we might be needed, and we couldn't achieve it without solid cooperation and communication between the Navy and Marine Corps."

The forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) served as a floating base of operations for the various drills and training included in the 16-day certification process.

"Essex Sailors were keenly aware of the importance of supporting the MEU CERTEX," said Capt. Dave Fluker, USS Essex, executive officer. "In order to execute the diverse mission sets upon which the Marines were evaluated, nearly every Essex Sailor played a role. Whether it was conducting flight operations, issuing ammunition, providing spare parts or serving over 8,000 meals a day, Essex Sailors quietly and professionally did their part to help ensure the success of the certification."

The certification included the evaluation of multiple evolutions, including small boat raids; visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) training; helicopter and mechanized amphibious raids; and a non-combatant evacuation operation.

"Essex personnel have provided the backbone for communications throughout this exercise," said Master Sgt. Ryan Parker, 31st MEU communications officer. "A large portion of CERTEX took place off the ship, and we could not have completed it without their hard work."

Monti, a veteran of MEU CERTEXs, said he was very impressed with the ability of the Sailors and Marines to coordinate during this exercise.

"This is my third CERTEX, and I know it is the best one we have done," said Monti. "We quickly became integrated with Navy personnel and executed our mission well from the ship."

The Essex ARG is led by Commander, Amphibious Squadron 11 and is composed of Essex, the amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver (LPD 9) and the dock landing ship USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) with the 31st MEU embarked. The Essex ARG is currently on patrol in the Western Pacific Ocean.

For more news from USS Essex (LHD 2), visit www.navy.mil/local/lhd2/.  


NNS101006-22. Current Daily News Update

From Defense Media Activity - Anacostia

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- Daily News Update features four newscasts each day - one two-minute newscast and three one-minute newscasts.



Two-minute newscast-
- Headlines from around the fleet: October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month; the Afghan National Army officially takes over responsibility for training Afghan combat medics from U.S. service members; USS Makin Island (LHD 8) is scheduled to participate in San Francisco Fleet Week October 7-12.
http://www.navy.mil/swf/mmu/mmplyr.asp?id=15067  



First one-minute newscast-
- Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif. opens its gates to the San Diego Community for its annual air show.
http://www.navy.mil/swf/mmu/mmplyr.asp?id=15068  



Second one-minute newscast-
- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) oral surgeons maintain the crew's dental readiness.
http://www.navy.mil/swf/mmu/mmplyr.asp?id=15069  



Third one-minute newscast-
- Naval Support Activity Rota, Spain Sailors raise money for Navy Ball.
http://www.navy.mil/swf/mmu/mmplyr.asp?id=15070  




Defense Media Activity Anacostia produces four Daily News Update (DNU) newscasts each day - one two-minute newscast and three one-minute newscasts. DNU can be seen throughout the day and evening on the Direct-to-Sailor (DTS) satellite television service available aboard 160 ships of the fleet and via the Navy Web site at www.navy.mil. Check your local DTS program schedule for air times. DNU can also be seen throughout the world on the American Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS).

For more news, visit www.navy.mil.

 
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NNS020723-21. This Day in Naval History - Oct. 06

From the Navy News Service

1884 - The Department of the Navy establishes the Naval War College at Newport, R.I.
1940 - The fourth group of eight U.S. destroyers involved in the Destroyers for Bases Deal are turned over to British authorities in Halifax, Canada.
1943 - In the Battle of Vella Lavella, three U.S. destroyers attack nine Japanese destroyers to stop evacuation of Japanese troops from Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands.
1958 - USS Seawolf (SSN 575) completes a record submerged run of 60 days, logging more than 13,700 nautical miles.
1962 - USS Bainbridge (DLGN 25), the Navy's first nuclear-powered destroyer, is commissioned.
1997 - NASA Astronaut Cmdr. Wendy B. Lawrence returns from mission with STS-86, when Space Shuttle Atlantis docks with Mir Space Station. The mission began Sept. 25.

For more information about naval history, visit the Naval Historical Center Web site at www.history.navy.mil.


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Navy News Service is the official news wire service of the U.S. Navy, containing stories recently posted to the Navy Web site at www.navy.mil. It is a product of the Defense Media Activity - Anacostia, 2713 Mitscher Rd. SW, Anacostia Annex, D.C., 20373-5819. Reprints should be credited to the Navy News Service (NNS).

For the latest in Navy news from around the fleet, visit www.navy.mil.  

For all Navy-related questions, review the FAQs posted at www.navy.mil or visit www.history.navy.mil.  

Media queries should be directed to the Navy News Desk at (703) 697-5342.

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